Fake Caller ID Scams on the Rise

Thursday, April 18 at 01:00 PM
Category: Arvest News

Arvest Bank is alerting customers about criminals who are using phone calls to impersonate their banks and steal personal information.

“I’m calling from Arvest Bank. Someone’s been using your debit card ending in 2345 at XYZ Store. I’ll need to verify your Social Security number — which ends in 8190, right? — and full debit card information so we can stop this unauthorized activity...”

In this scam, the caller ID shows the name of your bank, and the caller knows some of your personal details. Does that mean it’s legit? No. It’s a scam — and scammers are counting on the call being so unsettling that you might not stop to check your bank statement.

These phone scams combine two scammer tricks: “spear phishing” and caller ID spoofing. In a phishing attempt, scammers may make it look like they’re from a legitimate company. When they call or email with specific details about you — asking you to verify the information in full (things like your Social Security number or address) — that’s called spear phishing.

What makes this scam even more tricky is caller ID spoofing. That’s when scammers fake their caller ID to trick you into thinking the call is from someone you trust.

Here’s how you can avoid these scam tactics:

  • Don’t assume your caller ID is proof of whom you’re dealing with. Scammers can make it look like they’re calling from a company or number you trust.
  • If you get a phone call, email, or text from someone asking for your personal information, don’t respond. Instead, check it out using contact info you know is correct.
  • Don’t trust someone just because they have personal information about you. Scammers have ways of getting that information.

If you gave a scammer your personal or Arvest account information, please contact us immediately by calling Customer Service at (866) 952-9523, or visit a branch. To report a suspicious email, phone call or text message, please forward the suspicious email to, or send a message to: reportfraud@arvest.com.

Please visit our Consumer Protection section for information on Identity Theft, fraud, scams and online threats.

 

(Based on FTC resources)

Tags: Fraud Alert
 

CONSUMER ALERT: Mortgage Post Card Scam

Monday, March 04 at 02:00 PM
Category: Arvest News

Arvest Bank is warning customers about scammers sending post cards regarding mortgage loans. Some Arvest customers have reported that they are receiving pink or yellow cards from a Daytona Beach, Florida, bulk mailing with no return address. These cards contain a false loan number and instruct recipients to call a non-Arvest phone number immediately. If a customer calls the number, the scammers tell him or her that there was an error with a recently closed mortgage that requires refinancing.

If you receive one of these cards, please disregard it and contact us at 866-952-9523.

Please know that Arvest Bank takes your privacy seriously and would never communicate your loan information publicly this way. With the exception of the fake loan number, it is possible the information came from viewing public records once your mortgage was filed. For more information about how Arvest Bank protects your privacy, and how to report fraud, please visit https://www.arvest.com/about/privacy-and-security/.

Tags: Fraud Alert
 

CONSUMER ALERT: ‘Credential Harvesting’ Phishing Scams

Tuesday, July 31 at 02:00 PM
Category: Arvest News

Consumers need to be aware that credential harvesting phishing scams are on the rise.

As part of this phishing scam, criminals are sending personalized email messages with an alarming subject line, such as “Card Deactivation.” The emails include a button to “cancel” the deactivation process, which, once clicked, takes victims to a fake web page that requests user IDs, passwords, and answers to their security questions. Here some other commonly used subject lines used in these scams:

  • Online Banking Alert: Your Account will be Deactivated
  • Dear Valued Customer
  • Failed Package Delivery
  • Reviewing Payments
  • Serious Issues

Arvest Bank would like to remind our customers Arvest will never email, text, or call you unsolicited to ask for account information, social security numbers, online banking credentials, or other sensitive information.

What to Do

If you get an email that appears to be from Arvest Bank and is asking you to click a link and enter data, do not respond.

  • If you received an e-mail like this and entered your personal information, please contact us immediately at (866) 931-9743 so that we can protect your account.
  • If you received an e-mail like this, but did not divulge confidential information, please notify us via email at reportfraud@arvest.com. If possible, please include the original e-mail that you suspect is part of the phishing scam. 

Phishing scams come in a variety of forms. Although most are similar to this one, involving a spoofed email alert, others come in the form of customer service surveys, telephone calls, or even cell phone text messages. Please be aware that while most phishing scams direct you to fake websites, others may ask you to call a phone number where an automated phone system prompts you to divulge confidential information.

While it can be difficult to identify spoofed email messages, websites, and automated phone systems, it is not difficult to know if any of the above may be related to a fraudulent phishing scam. The key is knowing that legitimate businesses do not send messages to customers prompting them to divulge confidential information. If you receive such a message, no matter how genuine it may appear, assume it to be fraudulent and please notify the legitimate business immediately. 

Please visit our Consumer Protection section for information on identity theft, fraud, scams and online threats.

This post was updated on 8/2/2018

Tags: Fraud Alert
 

Asked to pay by gift card? It’s a Scam!

Tuesday, July 17 at 09:00 AM
Category: Personal Finance

Arvest Bank is warning consumers about scams related to gift cards.

According to the Federal Trade Commission (FTC), many people are being targeted by scammers asking for payment in the form of gift cards. These scammers may call people claiming to be with the IRS, or tech support, or a so-called family member in need. If you’ve gotten a call like this, you know that the caller will then demand the gift card numbers and PIN.

And, poof, your money is gone.

Scammers are good at convincing people there really is an emergency, so lots of people have made the trip to local merchants to buy gift cards to send these callers. And scammers love gift cards – it’s one of their favorite ways to get your money. These cards are like giving cash – and nearly untraceable, unless you act almost immediately.

Here’s the most important thing for you to know: anyone who demands payment by gift card is always a scammer.

Gift cards are for gifts, not payments. If you’ve bought a gift card and lost money to someone who might be a scammer, tell the company who issued the card. (The contact info might be on the card, but might require some research). Tell them their card was used in a scam. If you act quickly enough, they might be able to get your money back. But – either way – it’s important that they know what happened to you. And then please tell the FTC about your loss by visiting www.ftc.gov/complaint*. Your report helps the FTC try to shut the scammers down.

How to Report Fraud Related to Your Arvest Accounts

  • To report Identity Theft, financial fraud or an unauthorized transaction in your account, please contact Customer Service immediately at (866) 952-9523.

  • To report a lost or stolen credit, debit or ATM card, please contact Customer Service immediately at (866) 952-9523 or by using our Contact Us page.

  • To report a suspicious email, phone call or text message, please forward the suspicious email to, or send a message to: reportfraud@arvest.com.

Source: FTC

Links marked with * go to a third-party site not operated or endorsed by Arvest Bank, an FDIC-insured institution.

 

 

 

Tags: Financial Education, Fraud Alert, Gift Cards, Privacy and Security
 

Online Love Can Have Financial Risks

Thursday, April 12 at 02:00 PM
Category: Personal Finance

Arvest Bank is warning consumers about scams related to online dating

Millions of Americans use dating sites, social networking sites, and chat rooms to meet people. Many form successful relationships, but romance scammers also use these sites to meet potential victims. They create fake profiles to build online relationships, and eventually convince people to send money in the name of love.

According to the Federal Trade Commission, thousands of reports are made each year about scammers who create fake online relationships only to steal their victims’ money.

Unfortunately, an online love interest who asks for money is almost certainly a scam artist. Caution should be used when a newly formed relationship partner begins to ask for money.

The FTC has created a new infographic, developed with the American Bankers Association Foundation, which lists common signs of online dating scams and what to do if someone you meet online asks you for money. Victims may be embarrassed to talk about their experiences, but consumers can help one another by sharing this information. A simple phone call, email or text, saying “Look what I just found” and sharing this information may make a difference in someone else’s life.

How to Report Fraud Related to Your Arvest Accounts

  • To report Identity Theft, financial fraud or an unauthorized transaction in your account, please contact Customer Service immediately at (866) 952-9523.
  • To report a lost or stolen credit, debit or ATM card, please contact Customer Service immediately at (866) 952-9523 or by using our Contact Us page.
  • To report a suspicious email, phone call or text message, please forward the suspicious email to, or send a message to: reportfraud@arvest.com.

Below are specific tips from the FTC to identify a scammer in an online dating environment:

 

 

Tags: Financial Education, Fraud Alert

Choose one or more categories to subscribe to:

Cancel