CONSUMER ALERT: ‘Credential Harvesting’ Phishing Scams

Tuesday, July 31 at 02:00 PM
Category: Arvest News

Consumers need to be aware that credential harvesting phishing scams are on the rise.

As part of this phishing scam, criminals are sending personalized email messages with an alarming subject line, such as “Card Deactivation.” The emails include a button to “cancel” the deactivation process, which, once clicked, takes victims to a fake web page that requests user IDs, passwords, and answers to their security questions. Here some other commonly used subject lines used in these scams:

  • Online Banking Alert: Your Account will be Deactivated
  • Dear Valued Customer
  • Failed Package Delivery
  • Reviewing Payments
  • Serious Issues

Arvest Bank would like to remind our customers Arvest will never email, text, or call you unsolicited to ask for account information, social security numbers, online banking credentials, or other sensitive information.

What to Do

If you get an email that appears to be from Arvest Bank and is asking you to click a link and enter data, do not respond.

  • If you received an e-mail like this and entered your personal information, please contact us immediately at (866) 931-9743 so that we can protect your account.
  • If you received an e-mail like this, but did not divulge confidential information, please notify us via email at reportfraud@arvest.com. If possible, please include the original e-mail that you suspect is part of the phishing scam. 

Phishing scams come in a variety of forms. Although most are similar to this one, involving a spoofed email alert, others come in the form of customer service surveys, telephone calls, or even cell phone text messages. Please be aware that while most phishing scams direct you to fake websites, others may ask you to call a phone number where an automated phone system prompts you to divulge confidential information.

While it can be difficult to identify spoofed email messages, websites, and automated phone systems, it is not difficult to know if any of the above may be related to a fraudulent phishing scam. The key is knowing that legitimate businesses do not send messages to customers prompting them to divulge confidential information. If you receive such a message, no matter how genuine it may appear, assume it to be fraudulent and please notify the legitimate business immediately. 

Please visit our Consumer Protection section for information on identity theft, fraud, scams and online threats.

This post was updated on 8/2/2018

Tags: Fraud Alert
Leon Whitman on 8/13/2018 at 5:31 PM
I was scammed by a work at home offer in 2008 and in a very legitimate sounding scan to pay off the 2008 scam in 2011. I have com;any names, officers names and the bank information where the money was sent and have exhausted 17 Official Government agencies that are "consumer protection" agencies and have contacted Jim Inhoff who has been a friend for many years. The money was charged to my home equity line of credit. Is there anything more I can do? Please respond. Leon Whitman 918 836 8273 email leonandjean@gmail.com
Arvest Blog Admin on 8/15/2018 at 6:07 PM
Hi Leon, thank you for the message. We'll have someone from our management team connect with you.

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